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Post by Adminkunlex on Sun Nov 03, 2019 8:03 am

10 grammatical jargon often used by Nigerians.
In Nigeria, people use a lot of grammatical jargon
daily and most this jargon are/were/is believed to be
correct when view in the English man’s way, but
interestingly, most of this jargon often have no
sensible meaning when searched for in the dictionary.
Below are some compiled words.
(1)Installmentally:
This “word” is a favourite of many Nigerians, but,
sadly, it simply does not exist. You won’t find it any
reputable dictionary. The correct thing to say when
“installmentally” comes to your mind is in instalments
or by instalments.
(2)Plumpy:
Nigerians use “plumpy” when they want to say that
someone is chubby or slightly fat. The correct
expression is plump.
(3)Disvirgin:
This particular “word” is used severally on a daily
basis, especially by Nigerian men when they intend
saying that a woman has lost her virginity to a guy.
The correct word to use, however, is deflower,
because “disvirgin” is not a word depicting that
meaning.
(4)Crosscarpeting or cross-carpeting
This is a favourite of Nigerian politicians and political
analysts alike. They use it when they want to say
that a politician has dumped his political party for
another party, usually a rival party. The right terms to
use when describing this scenario are party switching,
defection and crossing the floor and not “cross-
carpeting” or “crosscarpeting.”
Go-slow: The word go-slow exists, but not in the way
Nigerians use it.
(5)A “go-slow,”
in the peculiarly Nigerian context, is a situation in
which road traffic is very sluggish due to vehicle
queues. However, go-slow in the English language
actually means an industrial tactic used by employees
whereby they intentionally reduce activity,
productivity and efficiency in order to press home
some demands. When this happens, you say that
work in the office, factory or organization is at a go-
slow. The correct terms to use when road traffic is
very sluggish due to vehicle queues are traffic jam,
traffic congestion, gridlock, and (less technically) hold-
up, not “go- slow.”
(6)Cunny
“Cunny” is not found in authoritative dictionaries, but
it can be found in some slang dictionaries. Over there,
it is a slang used to refer to a woman’s v**ina. The
correct term to use is cunning (which is used to
describe someone that is being deceitful or crafty)
and not “cunny.”
(7)Opportuned
There is nothing like “opportuned” anywhere in the
English language, but that has not stopped its blatant
use by all and sundry in Nigeria, including journalists
and writers. The correct word is opportune. The word
opportune is an adjective; therefore it has no past
tense. An adjective has no past tense. However,
some verbs can function as adjectives or adverbs in a
sentence. These verbs are called participles and they
do have past tenses. They are not pure adjectives.
Examples of participles are fattened, amused,
disgusted, mystified, overwhelmed, upset and bored.
Be that as it may, opportune is a pure adjective and
not a participle, therefore it has no past tense.
Opportune means appropriate or well- timed.
( Alright
“Alright” is a misspelling of the term all right. All right
is used when you want to say that something is
adequate, acceptable, agreeable or suitable. To
hardcore English language linguists, “alright” is not a
word. However, its usage is gaining traction and it’s
increasingly becoming acceptable. The Merriam-
Webster Dictionary – which is considered the gold
standard among American English speakers – has
recently drawn a lot of criticisms for its
permissiveness when it began indexing some
otherwise colloquial and street language terms,
including “alright.” Most linguists disagree with the
gradual acceptance of “alright” as a word by the
public and even the media, while those in the
minority are “alright” with it.
(9)Wake-keeping
“Wake-keeping” exists only in the imagination of a
few English speakers. As a matter of fact, there is no
such thing as “wake-keeping.” The correct word is
wake and not even “wake-keep.” Both “wake-
keeping” and “wake-keep” are ungrammatical.
(10)Screentouch: This bad grammatical expression
gained currency in Nigeria and neighbouring West
African countries with the influx of made-in-China
stylus pen touchscreen not- so-smart phones in the
mid 2000s. It was a novelty then; many in Nigeria
had not seen it – or even thought such advanced
technology was possible – before. So, they looked for
a name to call it and “screentouch” came to mind,
after all you just touch the screen and it starts
working. In case you’ve still not figured it out yet, the
correct thing to say is touchscreen and not
“screentouch.
So there you have it, 10 English language “words”
Nigerians love to use that are not found in the
dictionary. Feel free to add yours;

https://www.gbetutv.com/10-grammatical-jargon-often-used-by-nigerians/

Adminkunlex
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